• The Following is the Artist Statement, Teaching Philosophy, and Sample Syllabi's for Kevin M. Vanek

ARTIST STATEMENT 

In my studio process, the vision is to reinvent, with a child-like curiosity, forms that celebrate the use and history of industrial labor practices into objects of hope and recognition. Using industrial materials is an intuitive attempt to breathe new life into the reclaimed, and cultivate the spirit of the material. Instinctive decisions are made with some uncertainly to the outcome, allowing for an unfiltered growth of conceptual vision. My intention is to harmonize traditional materials and contemporary ideas into the semblance of a whole. The resulting forms are a by-product of construction craft and the poetics of material.


TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

It is my goal as a teacher to inspire students of any level to create unique works of art that promote individual and artistic growth.  Helping to build the confidence necessary to put themselves into the work and expose their personal desires, ideas, and concepts.  I strive for the work of my students to adhere to the three “H’s”, the Head, the Heart, and the Hand; also understood as Content, Passion, and Craftsmanship.  This is the basis of my teaching philosophy. 

This is achievable through clearly communicated project expectations utilizing visual/verbal instructional demonstrations and written instructions to accommodate various learning types, along with the development of a studio environment that promotes a comfortable environment for individual creativity.  Abiding by all health & safety standards as well as keeping the studio a place for open dialogue and free thought is imperative in creating an inspiring studio. 

I believe that it is my job to answer any question that may come up so I encourage students to engage in open dialogue and bring all questions forward.  Encouraging someone to work hard and to stay diligent is a necessity to achieving a successful project.  Risk taking is a must in contemporary art.  Without risk, without bending the rules, there can be no change.  My projects are created with opportunities for students to take these risks and grow beyond my teachings.  This inspires individual creativity and self-growth while simultaneously aids in developing a personal aesthetic. 

Teaching an understanding and honor for the history of sculpture along with the processes used to create it is of great importance.  With this, students can place themselves into the context of the art and look to the future.  This allows for the independent investigation of their work and its place in the contemporary art world.  These ideas combined are the building blocks of consciousness within art, allowing for intelligent material choices and technical execution, clear creative intent from beginning to end, and depth of concept. 

In the end, my priority is to help students facilitate their creative process from initial thought to completed object.  Keeping the focus on the students allows me to maintain fluidity in my teaching allowing for curriculum tailored to the individual. 


SCULPTURE:SURVEY

Instructor: Kevin Vanek    ART 2705 Section 001

Fall Semester: 2011   M, W 2:00pm-4:50pm

Office Location: Jenkins Fine Arts rm. 127  Room 133 Jenkins

Office HRS: Tuesday, Thursday 12-2pm

“Americans with Disabilities Act: East Carolina University seeks to fully comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Students requesting accommodations based on a covered disability must go to the department for Disability Support Services, located in Brewster A-114.”

REQUIRED CLASS STANDING - SOPHOMORE

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Sculpture survey is an introductory course focusing on permanent materials through the use of construction, reduction and casting processes.  In depth work with metal, assemblage and an introduction to welding will encourage the student to explore the expressive and conceptual potential of these materials.  The students will become versed in safe, efficient, creative handling of hand and power  tools, welding and fabrication, clay modeling, plaster carving, mold making, and metal casting.  Demonstrations, lectures, group and individual critiques will develop the student’s awareness of modern and contemporary sculpture.  Expression and meaning will be examined in critiques by questioning the interplay of form, content, and technique.

CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

A.  Completion of assignments on time and attendance at critiques

B.  Inventions, expression and resolution within the assignment guidelines and must be submitted by its due date.

C.  Quality of work and care in presentation.

D.  Initiative, attitude and class participation.

E.  Mastering and understanding of technical skills.

F.  Improvement of work throughout the course

G.  Clean up.  Safe and intelligent use of tools, materials and facility

H.  Attendance:  You are expected to be in class for the entire class period and working.  You may have THREE ABSENCES.  Each additional absence will lower your grade one whole letter grade.  Seven Absences will result in a Failing grade for the class.

I.  Comprehension of reading assignments

EVALUATION:

10% Attendance

90% Projects and Critiques

GRADING SCALE:

90-100  A

80-90  B

70-80  C

65-70   D

65 and below  F

*Final Exam Wednesday, December 14th at 2:00-4:30pm

Failure to attend Final Critique will result in a FAILING GRADE FOR THE CLASS, DO NOT MISS IT!!!!

SCULPTURE STUDIO POLICIES:

1-  The general sculpture area is open during all building hours.

2-  The welding and casting area will be secured.  Open hours will be established and posted.  Students must not be working alone in these areas.

3-  Strict adherence to wood shop rules as established by the shop supervisors is expected.

4-  All spray painting and work with toxic fumes should be done outside or in spray booth.

5-  In the welding/casting area, do not watch welding unless wearing the proper #4 or #10 goggles.  These areas are for metal fabrication and casting only, do not work with wood, plastics, plaster, clay, etc. here.

6-  Respect classmates and their work.  Share and respect the workspace.

7-  Wear appropriate work clothing: no loose clothing or jewelry that could get caught in a machine; synthetic fabrics are highly flammable; no loose long hair- tie it back; no bare feet, sandals, high heeled or open toe shoes.  Work boots are highly recommended, as are shop aprons or a special set of work clothes.  Long sleeves and pants are mandatory for welding with a protective jacket or apron.

8-  CLEAN UP!  This is a matter of safety, good work habits and consideration for your colleagues.

Objectives and Aims of the Class:

  1. Familiarize students with the four basic methods of making sculpture

   A. Modeling- direct and additive

   B. Carving- direct and subtractive

   C. Casting- direct and indirect

   D. Fabrication- direct, additive, and mechanical

  2. Develop individual sill in 3-D sculptural composition through practice.

  3. Promote a greater understanding and appreciation of sculptural work done in all ages through the shared experiences of the discipline.

  4. Develop mechanical and kinesthetic skills.

  5. Develop structural, volumetric and spatial sensitivities.

The Four Basic Sculptural Techniques:

  1.  Modeling-  Additive method- Clay, plaster, or wax is built up on itself or on an armature until Desired form is achieved.

  2.  Carving-  Subtractive method- remove material from a given mass until desired form is Achieved.

  3.  Casting-  The pouring of a liquid or fluid material into a container (mold) that gives itspecific shape.  The liquid subsequently freezes or hardens chemically making it possible to remove the container (mold) and free the finished sculpture.

  4.  Construction, Fabrication, or Assemblage-  Various materials are fastened together by mechanical means.  Pieces are welded, screwed,            glued, bolted, lashed, pinned, pegged, or interlocked 

COURSE PROJECTS AND ASSIGNMENTS:

  1. Plaster Carving
  2. Modeling in the Round sculpture with Complex Plaster Mold
  3. Welded Steel Cube and Welded Steel Rod creature
  4. Direct Armature Project

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES:

Notebook/sketchbook, Dust respirator, Plastic safety glasses, Protective gloves, An apron, a hat, Vaseline, paint, wire, sandpaper, plastic bags, and clay modeling tools, Plastic bucket

The Total Fee of $110.00 for the following materials will be paid to the sculpture guild by September 2nd.

100# bag plaster

Steel rods and sheet metal for welding projects

Hardware Cloth

2lbs. of wax

1-100#  bag of sand

1-25# bag of clay

8# of aluminum or iron

Various welding supplies, tips wire, electrodes and grinder discs. 



3-D FOUNDATIONS 

ARTS 102 – Spring 2014 M/W 7-9:10pm

Colorado Mesa University

Room CMU 3D Lab / Fine Arts Building

Instructor: Kevin Vanek

Office hours : 2-3 PM, MW by appointment

E-mail: kvanek@coloradomesa.edu 

“Americans with Disabilities Act: East Carolina University seeks to fully comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Students requesting accommodations based on a covered disability must go to the department for Disability Support Services, located in Brewster A-114.”

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

1. Interpret and apply formal elements and principles of design.

2.  Demonstrate application of tools, materials, techniques, and proper use and care for equipment through quality craftsmanship.

3.  Generate individual response through concept and theory beyond formal elements to create personal content.

4.  Communicate clearly regarding the critical analysis of art and design, both historical and contemporary.  

5.  Create and sustain a body of work through self-directed research, experimentation, risk-taking, and reflective analysis.

6.  Justify critical analysis of artwork based on material, conceptual, and critical analysis.

.CONTENT TO BE COVERED:

• Specific techniques for creative problem solving; methods to increase visual creativity and alter perceptual frameworks.

• The ways in which visual artifacts elicit intellectual and emotional responses.

• How context, scale, or materials create or change meaning; what visual artifacts “mean” on multiple levels.

• Similarities and differences between sculpture, functional design, site specific works, installation, and architecture

• Kinetics and time as related to our awareness of space and 3-D works

• How to identify or target visual audiences; Thinking as the viewer as well as the author.

• The use/abuse of symbols, stereotypes, cliché, kitsch, propaganda.

• Introduction to the woodshop, and woodworking and other diverse materials; include other materials that allow students to explore, additive, subtractive and hybrid processes.

• Elements and principles of 3-D design: Line and plane in space, degrees of dimensionality, implied line, shape, shape dynamics 

• Volume, mass, space, contact with the ground plane

• Materials, form & function, construction methods, effects of lighting (internal and external)

• Compositional dynamics, coherency conceptual theory, scale and proportion, unity/variety, gestalt principles of organization, positive/negative shape, balance, symmetries, focal point, pattern, repetition

• Modular, multiple, or grid structures

IMPORTANT NOTES

Workload 

This class will be demanding. The following statement is mandated by the Federal Government and describes the minimum workload:

An undergraduate student should expect to spend on this course a minimum of two hours outside the classroom for every hour in the classroom. The outside hours may vary depending on the number of credit hours or type of course. More details are available from the faculty member or department office and in CMU’s Curriculum Policies and Procedures Manual.

In coordination with Educational Access Services, reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified students with disabilities.  Please meet with the instructor the first week of class to make arrangements.  Nancy Conklin, the Coordinator of Educational Access Services, can be contacted at 248-1826, or in person in Houston Hall, Suite 108.

Communication 

It has been my experience that students who communicate with me tend to be the same students who excel.  Don’t hesitate to ask a question when things don’t make sense—confusion is an inevitable part of the learning (and teaching) process.  If you have a learning disability then please see me during the first week of class so that we can make arrangements.

Deadlines 

Projects and assignments have strict deadlines. If a project is submitted late, the grade will drop by one letter grade per class period. Grades will be marked down from their given grade. Hence, if you turn in “C” work one day late, it will be marked down to a “D”. 

Conduct

Come to class on time, prepared with supplies that are needed for that day's activities.  You may not leave during class to get supplies.  Always bring assignments at the beginning of the class period that they are due.  Keep your syllabus in your sketchbook (bring your sketchbook to every class) that way you always have these items to refer to.  Clean up your work area at the end of the period.  Throw away any trash; clean any leftover paint, water, charcoal, etc. 

Lockers There are lockers available for you in room CMU 3D lab.

Advice from Prior Students

 “Try to start on projects as early as possible, do not procrastinate.  Learn good craftsmanship.  Plan things out early.  Talk to Kevin early if you need help.  Don’t procrastinate.  Clean up after yourself.  Don’t wait until

the last minute.  Buy materials and tools early.  Use class time wisely, Start your project as soon as it is assigned, don’t wait until the last minute!  Keep this class one of your priorities—3D takes more time than 2D--don’t put it off, stay on task and don’t procrastinate.”

BREAKDOWN OF FINAL GRADE

GRADING:

1  Attendance is mandatory.  On the 4th absence your grade will be dropped one letter.  Every 3 late arrivals to class constitute one absence.

2  Grading is based on attendance/participation in the class and completion of required assignments. 

3  Attention to “housekeeping” and or cleaning of studio spaces

4  The class final will consist of your efforts during the prescribed clean up day.  Attendance is mandatory during the cleanup day as determined by the finals schedule.  If you do not attend and participate in the clean up day, you will receive an ‘F’ as a final grade.

Grading and Evaluation:

As a student enrolled in this course you must understand your performance and final grade are your responsibility.  No projects executed for other coursework will be accepted for this course. Please recognize the course objectives and comprehend the commitment the course will demand.  Address any questions or concerns to me promptly and be aware that all aesthetic grade decisions are at the instructors discretion.  No assignment will be accepted late. Final grades will be available only when the registrar posts them.  If at any point you are unsure of your progress or need to know what your course grade is consult with me immediately.  Concluding course grades are final and will not be reconsidered.  No Exceptions.

There Will be Three to four Major projects during the course of the semester and they will be graded as follows:

Technical Skill/ Craftsmanship: 50% of project grade

Effectiveness of project’s fabrication as evidenced by: 

o attention to detail

o creative and innovative technical problem solving

o mastery of techniques and formal elements employed

o presentation (project’s condition, level of completion, etc.).

Conceptual Strength: 30% of project grade

Will be measured by:

• the degree to which a project provokes thought or conversation

• creative and innovative intellectual problem solving 

• ability of finished work to communicate chosen subject matter 

• development of concept as it is/was evident in student’s research and proposals

• ability and willingness to communicate with instructor about concept during all stages of project development

• evidence of critical thinking in the concept.

 Ingenuity, Inventiveness, Progress, and Gumption: 

  20% of project grade

 Degree of self-motivation and self-discipline while working on project

 Degree to which student takes advantage of in-class work time

 Attitude and enthusiasm with which project is approached

 Degree to which your project pushes or goes beyond project requirements

 Level of improvement (if not first project)

 

 Class Participation: This includes participation in class and at critiques -- a critique should be a forum for intelligent comment and constructive criticism.  This portion of your grade will also be determined by respect for classmates, communal materials and tools, and the workspace (PLEASE CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF).  During our class time there will be a mandatory final cleanup which will count toward your grade.

Research Requirement: This portion of your project grade consists of gathering source material, sketches of project plans, brainstorming, and other exercises.  If a student misses class on the day that these assignments are due then they may turn their work in during the next class meeting.

GENERAL GRADING GUIDELINES

An “A” student

Clearlyexcels in the concept and fabrication of projects; has mastered the material.  Displays a sense of commitment to their work that is far beyond normal expectations; has the self-motivation and self-discipline needed for success.  Shows an exceptional combination of intelligence, insight, creativity, organizational skills, and commitment.  Comes to class prepared at all times.  Completes work on time.  Is very active in class critiques and discussions.  Has virtually perfect attendance.

A “B” student

Consistently obtains good results on projects; has a good understanding of the material.  Displays a sense of commitment to their work that is beyond normal expectations, has some self-motivation, but may need outside stimulus.  Shows some semblance of intelligence, insight, creativity, organizational skills, or commitment, but it is yet under-developed.  Comes to class prepared at all times, or almost.  Completes work on time.  Is somewhat active in class critiques and discussions.  Has good attendance, missing less than 3 classes.

 A “C” student

Obtains mediocre or inconsistent results on projects; has some concept of what is going on but clearly has not mastered the material.  Displays a reasonable commitment to their work within normal expectations; has an average level of motivation that relies on outside stimulus.  May be lacking in insight, creativity, organizational skills, or commitment.  Some students have exceptional ability but poor self-management or bad attitude; others are diligent but simply average in ability.  He/she lacks the ability to put it all together.  Comes to class prepared more often than not.  Completes work on time.  Is occasionally active in class critiques and discussions.  Has good attendance, missing only a few classes.

  A “D” student

Obtains poor results on projects; has little comprehension of the material.  Displays only occasional commitment to their work; lacks self-motivation.  Has little insight, creativity, organizational skills, or commitment.  Comes to class prepared only half of the time.  Has difficulty completing work on time.  Is seldom active in class critiques and discussions.  Has poor attendance.

  An “F” student Missed more than six classes.

Obtains poor or no results on projects; has no comprehension of the process.  Displays no commitment to their work; little or no self-motivation.  Rarely comes to class prepared.  Rarely completes work on time.  Is rarely active in class critiques and discussions

POLICIES

 Academic Honesty

According the Academic Honesty Policy of the Student Code, the following is prohibited and offenders shall be turned into Academic Officials;

 Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise.

 Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.

 Plagiarism: Representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic exercise.

 Open Studio

As a student enrolled in Sculpture classes you have extended access to the classrooms/ studio spaces to work on class work for Sculpture classes—You may use any of the Sculpture rooms whenever a class is not in session.  Use the facilities made available to you!

Clean up after yourselves, and leave the room in the same condition it was in (or better) or we will all lose the privilege of having Extended access to these rooms.

Attendance

A lot of learning in a studio course is the result of learning along with a group.  Since each of us may learn from working alongside and commenting to one another, ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY!!!  In order to insure equitable treatment of students, maintain the high standards of education within the program and promote the academic success of our students. The content and procedures used in studio courses are different from those utilized in other academic disciplines, making it very difficult or impossible to follow along outside of class or "make-up" missed meetings.  In addition, the collaborative and cooperative educational environment used by this program is dependent on the involvement and full participation of every student.  Every time you are absent you lower the quality of education for your peers as well as for yourself. 

• Missing more than 10% of regularly scheduled course meeting times (3 classes) results in the reduction of the final grade by a letter grade, and

continues for each additional absence up to the 6th absence.

• Missing more than 20% of regularly scheduled course meetings (6 classes) results in automatic failure for the course (or, seventh absence

results in a grade of "F").

• There are no "excused" or "unexcused" absences.  There is only presence or absence.  It is advised that you use this limited resource wisely.  It is possible you will have a legitimate illness or emergency during the term, so keep your 3 allotted absences open for emergencies.

• Arriving for class after the starting time or leaving class before dismissal constitutes a tardy.  The accumulation of 3 tardies is equal to an absence in the calculation of attendance.

• In the event of dramatic and extreme circumstances make an appointment to discuss your options with me.

 General Class Rules:

• No IPods – No cell phones.

• Excessive chatter or socialization will result in an absence for that classperiod.

• Coming to class without required working materials / tools / assignments for that day will result in an absence for that class period.

• During class presentations and critiques I expect that you will give the speaker your full attention.  Having an unrelated side conversation during

these times is distracting, disrespectful, and will not be tolerated.

SAFETY REGULATIONS

In order to ensure safe and responsible studio practice, the following policies are in effect for all sections of ARTE102.  Due to the daily interaction with hand tools, power tools, potentially hazardous materials and heavy materials, Instructors are permitted to send students home (with an absence) should they fail to comply with the following safety standards: 

• NO OPEN-TOED SHOES PERMITTED IN THE STUDIO--NO FLIP-FLOPS, SANDALS, ETC.

• LONG HAIR MUST BE TIED BACK 

• LOOSE OR BAGGY CLOTHING OR JEWELRY IS PROHIBITED AND MUST BE REMOVED

• SAFETY GLASSES MUST BE USED WHEN USING POWER TOOLS SHOULD YOU FORGET YOURS, SEE THE INSTRUCTOR

• SPRAY PAINTS AND OTHER FUME-PRODUCING MATERIALS ARE NOT TO BE USED IN THE CLASSROOM.  USE EITHER THE VENTILATION BOOTH LOCATED IN THE MODEL SHOP OR WORK OUTSIDE.  IF YOU ARE WORKING OUTSIDE BE SURE THAT SCHOOL PROPERTY IS APPROPRIATELY PROTECTED FROM OVERSPRAY. 

• POWER TOOLS ARE NOT TO BE USED WHEN THE INSTRUCTOR IS OUT OF THE STUDIO

• ALWAYS ASK!  IF YOU ARE UNCOMFORTABLE OR UNSURE ABOUT THE PROPER WAY TO USE A POWER OR HAND TOOL—SEE YOUR INSTRUCTOR OR THE WOOD SHOP TECHNICIANS.  USE YOUR COMMON SENSE!  IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DOING SOMETHING THAT IS DANGEROUS, TELL HIM OR HER!

Beginning Supply list:

-Sketchbook

-Drawing utensils (pencils, eraser)

-Xacto Knife and extra blades

-Box Cutter

-Ruler

-Masking Tape

-Small tool box to hold your tools (recommended)

More supplies will come Assignment to assignment, this is just to get you started

MISCELLANEOUS NOTES

• EXPECT TO SPEND OVER ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ON MATERIALS!

Bring this syllabus, your visual references, and project outlines

every day—you will need to refer to them during class.

• IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO GET IN-CLASS LECTURE NOTES OR IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS FROM OTHER STUDENTS, IN THE EVENT OF AN ABSENCE.

• THE INFORMATION ON THIS SYLLABUS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT ANY

TIME BY THE INSTRUCTOR. 


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